Saturday, April 28, 2012

La Bourrée (pp34-39)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.







Thursday, April 26, 2012

E Para Lo Loup (Bourrée)

This tune is found on page 28 of La Bourrée. Here it is performed by Claude Neupont with a very light (and delightful) touch.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

"La Bourrée" (pp28-33)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.










Friday, April 20, 2012

Thursday, April 19, 2012

"La Bourrée": Still Out There!


Over on concertina.net, Kautilya did some research and noticed that the Lique Auvergnate & du Massif Central -- the organization that originally published the Recueil -- continues in existance! I followed up on this and discovered that one of their "branches" is La Bourrée de Paris. This research was done in the context of a conversation about copyright and permissions, etc. I have sent a note to the president of La Bourrée, letting him know what I'm doing. In other news, folks at concertina.net and melodeon.net have embraced my plea for help and have begun work on putting together some sort of "free to the public" on-line tune book thingamajig.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

"La Bourrée" (Part 5)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.

One thing that strikes me about this book is that it has absolutely no squeezebox content at all. Everything is pipes, vielle, and singing. No matter! Here's the next batch of pages.

Performance Notes -- Page 13
Performance Notes 2, and
Rules of the Club -- Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18

Monday, April 16, 2012

"La Bourrée" (Tunes)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.

Just to balance the heavy front matter posts, here are two pages of tunes. More are on the way in a few days.

Page 79

Page 78

"La Bourrée" (Group Photo)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.

The insert placed after page 12.


"La Bourrée" (Introductory Essay)

I originally published this in batches, but the whole tunebook is available here.

Some years ago, at John Merrill's bookshop in Hallowell, ME, I ran across this gem:  Recueil de "La Bourrée": Chants & Danses Populaires du Massif Central, published in 1929. My original thought had been to re-typeset it using a publishing program and MuseScore, but -- with five kids, a new job, and a doctoral program -- I simply don't have the time. So I asked my daughter, Brigid, to photograph the book, and I'll be publishing the entire artifact here. I invite anyone who's interested, to use these images to create a more web-savvy presentation.

If this can be interpreted as a cry for help, then this next section very likely requires the most heavy lifting in terms of translation. Here is the introduction to the book.

Page 7
Page 8

Page 9

Page 10

Page 11

Page 12

Sunday, April 15, 2012

"La Bourrée" (1929 Tunebook)

"La Bourrée"IntroductionGroup PhotoTunes (pp78-79)pp13-18


UPDATE:  I have compiled the whole book HERE.

Some years ago, at John Merrill's bookshop in Hallowell, ME, I ran across this gem:  Recueil de "La Bourrée": Chants & Danses Populaires du Massif Central. Published in 1929, this was the product of a group of musicians, emigres, and enthusiasts in Paris. The book was in good shape when I got it, but the news print has deteriorated markedly.

My original thought had been to re-typeset it using a publishing program and MuseScore, but -- with five kids, a new job, and a doctoral program -- I simply don't have the time. So I asked my daughter, Brigid, to photograph the book, and I'll be publishing the entire artifact here. As I said, the book's in bad shape, with very brown pages and some fading ink. I invite anyone who's interested, to use these images to create a more web-savvy presentation. Maybe Jack over at the French Tunes wiki will have some ideas?

Over the next month or so I will publish five or so pages every three days.  In the end, I'll publish all of Brigid's source images on an attached page.

One note: in the past, I've taken the odd stab at translating small bits of French into English. I'm not going to do that here. My French is very bad, and gets even worse as small bits of writing become thoughtful essays. If anyone out there wants to tackle the translation, I would be most grateful and would publish that here.

Some front matter, first.

Title page


4th edition info

The secretary general

And the first few tunes:




This reminds me of what Frédéric Paris said about every tune having a lyric, and that tradFrench is as much a vocal tradition as a dance tradition. Hope you all enjoy this project.